Apartheid Grand Corruption

FW-de-Klerk_2601754b

Apartheid grand corruption

FW-de-Klerk_2601754b

Assessing the scale of crimes of profit from 1976 to 1994

A report prepared by civil society in terms of a resolution of the Second National Anti- Corruption Summit for presentation at the

National Anti- Corruption Forum, May 2006

http://opensecrets.org.za/wp/wp-content/uploads/Apartheid-Grand-Corruption-2006.pdf

And so as Former Presidents Thabo Mbeki and Kgalema Motlanthe engage with FW De Klerk, these are some of the crimes they must address.

3 Comments on "Apartheid Grand Corruption"

  1. Matthews Bantsijang | May 9, 2017 at 7:10 pm | Reply

    Disease of corruption was suppose to have been stopped a decade ago….

  2. Jeff Koorbanally | May 10, 2017 at 9:32 am | Reply

    We have this mystery!
    Three saperate independend reports coming to the same conclusion of corrupt activities/relationsship between SARB & ABSA and our Democracy Govt decides to do nothing about it???

  3. Jeff Koorbanally | May 10, 2017 at 10:00 am | Reply

    Then my learned friend Michael Oatley(Author of Ciex) clarified the Mystery!
    Eish….
    SUNDAY TIMES NEWS BY STEPHAN HOFSTATTER AND MZILIKAZI WA AFRIKA, 2017-01-22 00:00:00.0
    Spy blames shelving of Absa report on Mandela

    Former British spy Michael Oatley says Nelson Mandela scuppered his investigation into apartheid looting because he feared it would alienate Afrikaners who had cut secret deals with the ANC.

    This is claimed in letters Oatley wrote this week to public protector Busisiwe Mkhwebane and her predecessor Thuli Madonsela. The letters, seen by the Sunday Times, were sent after the public protector’s draft report of a suspect bailout by the Reserve Bank of Absa’s predecessor Bankorp was leaked.

    The State Security Agency hired Oatley’s company CIEX in 1997 to investigate the bailout.

    In the letters, Oatley slams Mkhwebane for “mangling” Madonsela’s report. He says it was Mandela, not Mbeki as Mkhwebane’s report states, who halted his investigation.

    Mbeki “sat up late going over my reports and discussing them with me, encouraging me”, he says.

    “He particularly liked my suggestion that we would provide revelations about systemic Afrikaner white corruption to balance the much lesser (then) instances of black official corruption which were being hyped by an unfriendly media.”

    Oatley believes Mandela was briefed only after two ministerial meetings where his recommendations were endorsed.

    “After that it all came unstuck. When he learned of it, President Mandela ruled that moving against Absa, and effectively the Afrikaner financial nexus, was inconsistent with his policy of reconciliation (and with) secret pre-change agreements,” he says. “By then, of course, Absa had made itself the ANC’s best friend.”

    In his letter to Mkhwebane, Oatley says important papers he supplied to Madonsela are missing from the list of documents she said she relied on to produce her report.

    This resulted in “fundamental errors and distortions”, he says.

    The documents that Oatley says are missing include:

    • Three reports compiled by CIEX about the Absa lifeboat, with detailed recommendations on how the money could be recovered;

    • Specimen criminal charges to be brought against former Reserve Bank governor Chris Stals;

    • Oatley’s correspondence with Mbeki and former State Security Agency boss Billy Masetlha and;

    • Notes of meetings with cabinet ministers.

    He says the documents would contradict the claim by Mbeki that the government terminated his company’s services because of a “failure to deliver”.

    The public protector investigation began in 2011 when advocate Paul Hoffman accused the government of wasting millions hiring CIEX to investigate the Absa lifeboat, then failing to pursue the case.

    The leaked report recommends that the Reserve Bank should start legal action against Absa to recover R2.25-billion for an apartheid-era bailout of Bankorp in 1985.

    Absa said it would make further submissions in response to the report to correct “several factual and legal inaccuracies” without specifying these.

    Mkhwebane said through her spokesman Oupa Segalwe that she would not comment “because we do not engage publicly on the content of leaked documents”.

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